Modifying tasks for students with learning difficulty


To make the curriculum accessible, consider the following alternatives in relation to content, teaching materials and the responses expected from the learners:
Modification: e.g., computer responses instead of oral responses.
Substitution: e.g., different task that follows the same theme
Omission: e.g., omitting very complex work
Compensation: e.g., self-care skills, vocational skills.

Step 1: educators ascertain if learners can work at the same level as their peers;
Step 2: the learners may be able to do the same activity but with adapted expectations (e.g., fewer words);
Step 3: they may be able to do the same activity but with adapted expectations and materials (e.g., matching words to pictures)
Step 4: they may be able to do a similar activity but with adapted expectations (e.g., using words that are functional to the learners' environment)
Step 5: they may be able to do a similar activity but with adapted materials (e.g., using a computer spelling program)
Step 6: they may be able to do a different, parallel activity (e.g., learning a computer program with a spell check)
Step 7: they may be able to carry out a practical and functional activity with assistance (e.g., playing with a word puzzle, flash cards etc., possibly assisted by a peer or a teaching assistant).

Source:  David Mitchell (2008). What Really Works in Special and Inclusive Education: Using Evidence-Based Teaching Strategies (Kindle Locations 293-294). Kindle Edition.

Comments